Design Contributing to your great evening out

A great evening by design

As post-modern Americans, we live largely in a built environment. Because of that, appreciation of design has become a big part of our life. We notice and care about the design of our mobile phones, our clothing, our gardens. An evening from Just the Ticket: An Insider’s Guide to Great Evenings Out in Washington, DC provides many opportunities to evaluate and discuss different disciplines of design.

  • The décor of your restaurant, both outside and in, gives you a chance to think about and talk about the visual and audio design of the place.
  • Mixology or cocktail crafting is its own realm of design.
  • The chef designs the dishes for flavor, aroma, and visual appeal.

It can be fun to consider how these different disciplines of design articulate with one another during your meal. Do the sound and sight of your surroundings support or distract from the culinary design elements? Are the general themes of the design around you saying anything to you? Are you and your companions picking up on the same things?

If you stay for dessert, pastry chefs do some of the most elaborate and playful design, with bold graphics in sauces, jewel like colors, and intentional contrasts of sweet and sharp. Did this final course remain in conversation with the rest of the meal or did it make its own separate statement?

When you get over to the theater, there are many recognized disciplines of design all working to craft your experience.

  • The architect who designed the lobby and auditorium probably hits you first.
  • Your playbill is the work of several authors and a graphic designer who probably also had a hand in any posters you saw in the lobby.
  • If there is music or other soundscape playing in the auditorium, the sound designer for the show probably chose it – the same person responsible for sound effects and incidental music in a non-musical play.
  • Curtains being rare, you’re probably able to glance over what the set designer has done to help create the world of the play.
  • Eventually, the lights will go down and come up again, as chosen by the lighting designer whose job it is to color emotional tones and direct your attention where the play wants it from moment to moment.
  • When actors enter the stage they will be wearing things chosen for them by the costume designer and carrying things picked by a props designer.
  • With greater frequency, live plays are supported by projected images or videos which are assembled by a projection designer.
  • A playwright has designed the words to be spoken and much of the action to be carried out.
  • The director designs the whole experience much in the way that the executive chef did for you earlier in the evening.

Most of the same questions we brought up for your dining experience also apply to the play. Are the elements of design working together to enhance your experience of the play? If things stand out or clash, is that an error, or is there content in the clash? Do elements of the design draw your attention to specific places or moments? Are those the places and moments you wanted to pay attention to? In what ways did you feel a unified experience of design, experience, and story? Delivering that whole package, or thwarting the whole package to make some kind of point, is the primary work of the director.

In the bar after the show, you can both appreciate most of the same elements we talked about for the restaurant and have some great conversation about how the different disciplines of design throughout the evening have contributed to your enjoyment. Do you see yourself as a connoisseur of design in daily life? What kinds of design interest you the most? Please let us know with comments below or a note to peteandsara@greateveningsout.com.

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